Human capital and earnings inequality in Brazil, 1988-98
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Human capital and earnings inequality in Brazil, 1988-98 quantile regression evidence by G. R. Arabsheibani

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Published by World Bank in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Brazil.

Subjects:

  • Human capital -- Brazil.,
  • Rate of return -- Brazil.,
  • Income distribution -- Brazil.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementG. Reza Arabsheibani, Francisco Galrao Carneiro, and Andrew Henley.
SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 3147, Policy research working papers (Online) ;, 3147.
ContributionsCarneiro, Francisco Galrão., World Bank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3285644M
LC Control Number2003616342

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Human capital and earnings inequality in Brazil, G. Reza Arabsheibani & Francisco Galrao Carneiro & Andrew Henley, "Human capital and earnings inequality in Brazil, quantile regression evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series , The World Bank. Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps Download Paths Of Inequality In Brazil books, This book presents multidisciplinary analyses of the historical trajectories of social and economic inequalities in Brazil over the last 50 years. As one of the most unequal countries in the world, Brazil has always been an important case study for scholars interested in inequality research, but in. Income inequality in Brazil. Brazil’s income inequality is very high and persistent over time, and it has deep historic and regional roots. The income of the richest 20% in Brazil is equivalent to 33 times the income of the poorest 20%. As such, Brazil has one of the highest levels of income inequality in the world. (World Bank, ).

Historically, Brazil has had one of the highest levels of inequality in the world; in , for example, Brazil had a Gini coefficient of , making it the second most unequal country in the world, narrowly behind Sierra Leone.1 However, inequality has fallen in Brazil every year since For example, the second paper, 'Human capital and income inequality' (Lee and Lee ), conducts an econometric analysis of the impact of human capital, measured by educational attainment, on. Brazil 's economy has shown significant strength since the s after struggling with chronic, high inflation and GDP gains that only slightly exceeded population growth through the s.[i] In.   The model demonstrates that under plausible conditions (i.e., credit market imperfections and fixed costs in the acquisition of human capital), income distribution has a long-lasting effect on investment in human capital, aggregate income, and the development process. 14 In particular, if the interest rate for borrowers is higher than that for.

Abstract The authors undertake an empirical examination of rates of return to human capital for men in Brazil, through the period of macroeconomic stabilization and trade liberalization, using data from the , , and Brazilian household surveys (Pesquisa .   Abstract. Arabsheibani, Carneiro, and Henley undertake an empirical examination of rates of return to human capital for men in Brazil, through the period of macroeconomic stabilization and trade liberalization, using data from the , , and Brazilian household surveys (Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios, PNAD).Cited by: 8. We investigate empirically how human capital, measured by educational attainment, is related to income distribution. We find that the regressions, using a panel data set covering a broad range of countries between and , show that a more equal distribution of education contributes significantly to reducing income inequality. from the household survey, both for earnings and for household incomes. It is shown that observed circumstances are a major source of outcome inequality in Brazil, probably more so than in other countries for which information is available. Nevertheless, the level of inequality.